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August 29, 2014, 01:00:55 PM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumCandidates, Job Seekers, Employees, Consultants & Contractors CentreRecruitment: Job Hunting and Interviews (Moderators: HireScores.com admin, HireScoresMark)What to do if your interview is going bad?
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Tomtom
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« on: August 26, 2008, 03:05:59 AM »

Going to an interview can be very stressful, but what can you do if you feel that the interview is going bad?  Is it possible to turn the interview around and come out on top?  What are some suggestions when you feel interview is going down the drain?
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Pepper
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2008, 05:18:01 AM »

If your interview is going bad, I suggest you start asking the interviewer questions about how he came to work at the company. Find out where he started his career and what attracted him to his area of expertise. Basically, get the interviewer to talk about himself.  People always like to talk about what they do for a living, the choices they made on getting there and what they like about their job.  This strategy is an excellent opportunity for you to reposition yourself and look more favorably to the interviewer.
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Interview Coach
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2008, 04:07:20 PM »

You can take control of the interview by asking job and company related questions such as "Please describe a typical work day in this position", "What are the priorities for the successful candidate in this job?". This gets the interview back on track.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2013, 01:16:29 PM by Interview Coach » Report to moderator   Logged
MaryG
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2008, 09:16:16 AM »

I once had a friend call me after an interview in tears because she thought she had completely messed it up. About halfway through, she actually stopped the employer and said something along the lines of "I'm sorry. I'm so nervous about this interview because it seems like the perfect job for me and I really want it. I'm kind of stumbling over my own words, trying to find the perfect answer for your questions, in hopes of impressing you somehow."

Turns out, taking the initiative to acknowledge she was messing up actually landed her the job. The employer later told her that being up front and honest is what impressed her.  My friend was able to recompose herself after that and did great with the rest of the interview.

It's worth keeping in mind that the employer likely knows it's going downhill, too, and anything you can do to pull it back together is worth trying. And sometimes, it's not going downhill at all, and it's just being nervous that makes it feel bad. 
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Robin Tetley
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2008, 12:06:04 PM »

That's a great story. I don't see how being honest, in the right way of course, can ever be a bad thing in an interview.

As nervous as the candidate gets the person doing the interviewing is human after all.

Jonathan perhaps you should have said something about your radiator incident to the interviewer? Or did you?
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Bob
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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2008, 03:30:38 PM »

I've had a rocky work history to say the least and when interviewed for the job I do now, rather than not mention it and hope they didn't study my CV loads I just came clean with them and explained what had happened. I know my honesty there was appreciated and maybe even helped me get the job.

Put it this way if I hadn't explained things I don't think I'd be working here now.
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Robin Tetley
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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2008, 12:35:25 PM »

I guess honesty always is the best policy then.
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Bob
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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2008, 06:01:09 PM »

It depends on the situation really but there's no point trying to wriggle out of something delicate at an interview. I think it's best to face it head on and see where the chips fall.
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lava
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« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2008, 08:24:11 AM »

If the interview is going bad, I don't think there is much you can do to "fix it".  The only possible solution is to ask for a moment to think about what was just said and mentally pretend you are starting over.

Basically, job interviews can be tricky and it is important to think positive even if the interview is going wrong.  Chances are, the interview isn't going as bad as you think it is and maybe you just might get hired.
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Robin Tetley
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« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2008, 06:02:15 PM »

It's true that to you the candidate who REALLY REALLY wants the job you're bound to think it's all falling apart. The interviewer of course will see many people and it wont be such a big deal to them. You'll probably have worried about this moment for a few days and there's far more on the line for you to blow.
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britannia64
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« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2009, 06:30:59 PM »

Ask if there is an appropriate time to go to the toilet to refresh and calm down so that you can refocus your energy.

But other than that don't panic and cut it off at the start so that you are well prepped.

Good luck
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ktweeden
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« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2009, 04:46:36 PM »

Preparation before hand goes along way to help reduce nerves going in, so researching the company and thinking of questions you would like to ask the interviewer is always a good idea. However, that doesn't mean that nerves don't get the best of us despite this! I think the idea of asking the interviewer about their own time in the company is a great idea, it allows you time to calm yourself whilst showing your interest in the company.
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Jasper9
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« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2010, 01:54:35 PM »

Don't worry about nerves!  It is just a job.  There will be others.  It is the employer who will be missing out by not giving you the job.  You are doing them a favour by just being there.  So no nerves.

If you feel the interview is going badly, usually because you haven't been offered the job there and then, take control.  Go over your achievements, flatter the interviewer about the company and keep on going until you feel you have done everything.

At the end of the day it is the first impression that counts and you never get a second  chance to make a first impression.

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philipj
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« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2012, 05:52:22 AM »

Thanks to all for sharing these useful tips about interview this is very useful information you have shared these will help many people in there interview.
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Jasper9
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« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2012, 11:42:42 AM »

Basically if an interview is going badly, just get up and walk out and retain your dignity would be my advice.
If the interviewer cannot see how good you are why would you still want to work for him?
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