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December 19, 2014, 10:40:03 PM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumCandidates, Job Seekers, Employees, Consultants & Contractors CentreCareer and Employment Advice (Moderator: HireScores.com admin)Salary advice
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Betty
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« on: April 03, 2007, 06:37:14 AM »

I often find it difficult when going to an interview and they ask, "What is your expected salary for the job you are applying for."  I never know what is the proper way to anwser this question.  I want to give them an answer that represents my qualifications, yet I don't want to present a figure that makes me look greedy.  Any suggestions?
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MaryG
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« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2007, 05:39:47 PM »

The best advice I can give you is to not undersell yourself. Make certain that you know what the least amount you would be willing to take is and what the competitive rates are in your field. There's nothing wrong with responding with a salary range as opposed to a finite number.
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stanford
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2007, 05:54:45 AM »

Good answer MaryG. The best thing to do is research what companies are paying for the job you are applying for.  Also remember its your qualifications and skills that got you the interview.  This is a strong indication that you have something they want.  Never sell yourself short and never give a quick response when negotiating a salary.  Hesitating demonstrates that you may have other job offers and you realize that your skills deserve a fair price.   
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HRManager
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« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2007, 07:32:05 AM »

I like the comment about not answering too quickly!

I think a range works well but be sure to set the bottom of your range where you minimum is since they are unlikely to go that far above your bottom number but it does make you sound flexible on salary.  You also need to think about this in the context of your current salary - if you as for too big a leap they will not take your application seriously. 

If you are being placed through an agency talk to the agency in advance about what they see as a suitable salary.
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Tammy
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« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2007, 07:38:03 AM »

I think that sometimes you need to go for a bit salary increase - if, for example, you have been underpaid previously.  This might be because you were working part time or doing a jobthat was not using all your skills

Also if you are in the charity sector and moving to the private sector this would be an time when the salary would excpect to increase quite a bit.  I guess you can explain this one.  I also guess that you need to have your reason for the change sorted out and so when you talk salary you can say would expect to get salary commensurate with the company norms or something like that, and explain that had been on low salary coz in charity sector (and were happy with this but would not wish it to carry forward).
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Seb
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« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2007, 07:41:31 AM »

I agree that mostly you need to look for an increase that is in the 10%-20% range.

There are sometimes exceptions.  One exception for me is if you are moving from a low cost to a high cost area.  I think here is is good to be open.  Best to try to get the salary norms sussessed out but if you cannot then something like - I was paid at the top of the range for my job with my current company due to my performance, skills, experience.  The cost of living here is quite different and so your salary ranges will also be different but I would be hoping to be placed towards the top again...
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Serious
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« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2007, 07:45:45 AM »

I think that if you are applying to a big company it is OK to not answer this question.  Indeed you can ask them their salary range for the position since they are going to have this sort of structure and are unlikely to underpay you too much since this would become obvious once you started.

However, for smaller companies it is more important since they might not actually have any idea of your worth or generally be happy to pay as little as possible since the differentials will not be an issue.

I think the best way is to do research prior to the interview - so that you can find out what you think you are worth and not indadvertetly undersell yourself.
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freeform
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« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2007, 11:00:03 AM »

Just for comparative purposes you might like to try http://www.salaryexpert.com/
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Mark Nagurski
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MaryG
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« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2007, 05:41:16 PM »

That's a great link that you provided, Mark (freeform). I wasn't aware that there were sites specific to comparing salaries. I especially like that it not only has global comparisons but a cost of living analysis. That's an important consideration when looking at a new job. Thanks again!
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Wayne
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« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2007, 08:35:40 PM »

I would always be very honest about what salary I expected. There is no point in going through the whole process of applying and finding at the end that the salary is not what you wanted.
Most people are aware of a rough figure they expect for a job they are applying for so why not tell the interviewer ' I would expect in the region of $***** based on my experience and qualifications' that way you don't waste your time or theirs.
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Richard - Premier Recruitment
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« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2007, 09:42:50 PM »

If you do go through an agency, let them negotiate the salary for you, it takes the pressure away from you and a good recruiter should have good negotiaton skills Wink
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Richard
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"The success of any business is reliant on the people within it"
attagirl
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« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2007, 06:59:46 PM »

I generally answer the question with something like this. "I am sure that we can come to an agreement between the amount of money you are willing to pay and the cost of the services I will be able to provide to the company". Every time I have used this line I have gotten the job, at a salary that was negotiated to be fair to everyone.
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