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November 23, 2014, 01:51:51 AM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumCandidates, Job Seekers, Employees, Consultants & Contractors CentreRecruitment: CVs/resumes and Applications (Moderators: Lisette, Forum Management)Different job? Different resume
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MaryG
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« on: March 28, 2007, 12:43:09 PM »

In my time as an employer I found myself weeding through many resumes which were clearly generic and designed to be sent out en masse. I often wouldn't look too closely at those resumes, instead favoring those which were catered to the job sought. What I am attempting to impart in this message is that it is worth taking the time to research the job for which you are applying and putting the relevant goals, skills and experiences on a resume specifically written for the job. Choose your words carefully, use the descriptions of job functions that are similar to what you would be doing in the job you are seeking. A little extra time may make the difference between an interview and a job thats been filled.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2007, 04:33:46 PM by MaryG » Report to moderator   Logged
Wayne
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2007, 09:10:15 PM »

Good points.
I always encouraged people to keep their cv's resumes on file in a computer so that they could be updated quickly. The other advice I used to give was always include why you think you would be an asset to employ, what would you bring to that business. After all what is the question we all fear most? 'why should we employ you?' well tell them in your cv/ resume.
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MaryG
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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2007, 02:24:52 PM »

That's an interesting point about the question "why should we employ you?" I think that potential employers are less likely to wonder and ask about that if they have a good sense of what you have to offer before you even walk in the door. And if a candidate can't get that point across in their resume I'd have to wonder if they would be able to answer the question if asked directly. If you, as a candidate, are unsure of your skills for a job I am convinced it will show in your resume.
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lava
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« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2007, 09:36:54 PM »

I agree too.  Resumes need to be altered for differnt jobs you are applying for.  My mistake was always putting down every single job I every had.  I thought the employeer would be impressed with my list of jobs and skills I have developed.  It wasn't until I sat down with my career counselor that I learned how to design my resume for a specific job.  Now my reume is easier to read and demonstrates that I am the perfect candidate for the job.
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Maya
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2007, 10:39:57 PM »

I had always thought of C.V.s or resumes of being a mini history of qualifications, jobs and experience until relatively recently. I work in the Civil Service in the UK and there is a definite move towards competence-based appraisals and job applications. Thus, I would now say that C.V.s need to be tailored towards the job that you are applying for, to demonstrate that you have the competences required.
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Lisette
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2007, 08:03:36 PM »

I am definitely a support of the idea of a different job a different covering letter.  With the resume I think that if you have examples of achievements these can be varied but you do want to give the full picture so cannot slant it too much.  If you do a more competency/skills type resume then this definitely needs to be changed for different jobs.

In the UK, of course, resumes (CVs) tend to be two pages not one and they are either traditional (jobs listed with achievements) or skills based (skill/copmetency as a heading with achievements/examples to illustrate underneath). The latter needs more customisation than the former. 

As a consultant I produce one page 'profiles' to accompany my proposals for projects and these I adjust completely from 'job' to 'job'.

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Debbie
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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2007, 08:54:53 PM »

I always try to change my resume a little to give a slant to the company I am approaching. Generic resumes I think give out the wrong message and don't show you are really interested in that business rather you are just pushing out resumes in hope.
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Lisette
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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2007, 10:06:02 PM »

I definitely agree with this.  It is a bit more work but I think it is the right thing to do.  One of the challenges in recruitment is spotting talent amongst all the applications and I think that by personalising it you make the job much easier for the recruiter as well as demonstrating the right/a professional attitude
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Tammy
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« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2007, 10:11:24 PM »

Hi Debbie, welcome to the forum.  I agree with you, customing the CV and also the covering letter, is definitely the thing to do
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attagirl
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« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2007, 07:40:16 PM »

I would say that you need to make the resume stand out by making it a little more person to the company in which you are applying for. Many new comers to the job market are not given this information and the ones that are generally the ones that fill those open jobs.
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