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October 24, 2014, 02:29:18 PM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumForum CommunityGeneral stuff (Moderators: HireScores.com admin, HireScoresMark)Colleges need to change
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Author Topic: Colleges need to change  (Read 3887 times)
Greg
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« on: March 24, 2007, 09:59:49 PM »

I feel many colleges promote majors are are worthless.  Colleges have degrees such as philosophy and communication that provide useless careers. There's not much you can do with a degree in Philosophy. You spend 4 years in college only to find out you made a huge mistake as you try to find a job.  These schools need to redefine themselves and provide useful degres so students will find succesful careers. 
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Betty
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2007, 06:30:02 AM »

I believe colleges do provide useful careers for those interested in becoming a nurse, accountant, lawyer, dentist, doctor, architect, etc.  These careers are specialties and colleges are geared to educating people in their specialty.  However, I do understand what you are saying Greg.  There are certain majors that put false hopes in these students. These majors don't provide much opportunity for students after graduation.  Many students are surprised to realize their college major doesn't guarantee them a job.  I have seen many college students graduate and end up working in the mall as a sales clerk or in a restaurant as a waitress.  Their career dreams quickly disappear as they face the reality of a dead end major.  So who is to blame?  The colleges?  Or naive students?
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freeform
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2007, 10:40:35 AM »

Just because a degree doesn't lead into a specific field or profession certainly doesn't make it worthless. Apart from the simple benefit of learning for its own sake, the commitment required to complete a degree is a benefit to anyone applying for a job of any description.

Having studied International Relations (i.e. politics and stuff) I would have been qualified to make tea in some govt department but the general skills in terms of study, writing, crafting an argument, analysis etc... have served me well in a completely unrelated discipline.
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Mark Nagurski
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MaryG
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« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2007, 05:47:27 PM »

You spend 4 years in college only to find out you made a huge mistake as you try to find a job.   
While I understand the point you are trying to make, Greg, I think that this sentence may speak to some of the problem. A lot of people going to college really aren't sure what they want to do when they "grow up"  Smiley so they choose a major without thinking about the future and what they will likely be doing to make a living. There's nothing wrong with this necessarily but I think college programs which require an internship early on in the the coursework are very helpful in helping students decide whether they have embarked upon the best career choice.
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lava
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« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2007, 08:43:04 PM »

Yes I agree MaryG, internships are a good idea to determine if this is the right career for you.  What I hate about college is huge cost of tuition. In the USA the average cost of a 4 year private college is $25,000.  The average cost of a 4 year public college in state is $14,000 and the average cost of a 4 year college out of state is $20,000.  These costs don't clude books, meals, or dorms.  Is it really necessary to pay so much money?  What about those people who can't afford to pay for college?  High prices discourages many people from trying to generate a better life for themslves.  If America wants to continue being a superpower, affordable education needs to be our main priority.
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freeform
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« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2007, 10:37:59 AM »

I'm not sure what the options are really - colleges are expensive places to run.

Some kind of govt subsidy would sound appealing - although I assume Community Colleges do get something

Personally I like the idea of the govt paying for tuition etc.... in return for graduates doing a number of years as teachers or other profession that 'pays something back' into the community.

Obviously the armed forces do this - and I think it got a run out on West Wing once  Wink - but is it an idea that is in use in the US?
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Mark Nagurski
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Greg
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2007, 06:25:30 PM »

I know that in the US, there are some states that provide free college education as long as you maintain a "B" average.  I know that Georgia has a HOPE scholarship program for their residents. Those who qualify must maintain a "B" average in high school.  Once they graduate, they can go to a public college for free, but must maintain a "B" average in college. This program will also pay $150 per semester for books.  Is anyone else familiar with this?  Are there any other states that offer this type of program?
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MaryG
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2007, 08:00:05 PM »

I know that there are some states that offer loan forgiveness programs. They are for people who pursue certain careers and for each year that you are employed in that field within the state a percentage of your debt is forgiven. It's a good idea but doesn't solve the initial problem of putting up tuition while you are in school. Maybe countries like Israel which provide college education for a compulsory stint in the military have stumbled upon something valuable; they have military personnel and also have incentive for citizens to be loyal to their country.
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freeform
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« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2007, 12:43:00 PM »

provide college education for a compulsory stint in the military have stumbled upon something valuable; they have military personnel and also have incentive for citizens to be loyal to their country.

That's kind of what I was getting at but expanded from the military to include teaching or being a public defender if you studied law etc..... I.e. we pay for your tuition and books, you work for us for 2 years on a small salary when you graduate

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Mark Nagurski
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Lisette
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« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2007, 06:07:56 PM »

I have always thought that you should get a free loan and then pay this off through a higher personal tax rate (which effectively means tests it) following graduation.  But we could add a discount if you do 'good work' at a low salary  Smiley

How do we make this forum so successful that govenment policy makers start to read it! Grin
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MaryG
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« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2007, 05:24:51 PM »

Lisette, that's an approach that I never thought of! It's a great idea; I'd like to be able to know exactly how my taxes are being allocated. In the US teacher or other "doers of good work" do have some leeway for loan forgiveness but under stringent area of need standards.
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