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9182 Posts in 2295 Topics- by 184 Members - Latest Member: benjonesaa

July 25, 2014, 12:17:44 PM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumCandidates, Job Seekers, Employees, Consultants & Contractors CentreCareer and Employment Advice (Moderator: HireScores.com admin)Mid career evaluations
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Author Topic: Mid career evaluations  (Read 1675 times)
netpal
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« on: March 23, 2007, 08:48:58 AM »

I feel it is very important to take a look at our career when we are at the middle of our career life span. It gives a necessary evaluation of how the graph has moved and at which direction one needs it to move. Please share your views here.
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Betty
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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2007, 05:50:23 AM »

I consider myself in the process of evaluating my life span.  I've made good and bad choices in my career path.  I went to college and graduated with a degree in communication.  After grauation I went looking for work and found a job as a home health care aide.  I enjoyed helping the elderly and taking care of them. However, working for the the agency was not good.  They could not provide steady work for me.  I eventually left, got married, became pregnant, and decided to be a stay at home mom.  Now the children are older and I am ready to start a new career path. My college degree in communication did not provide enough job opportunities for me.  I'm ready to redefine myself and choose a career I am proud of.
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Seb
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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2007, 09:31:41 PM »

I am not far enough into my career to do a mid career evaluation - but agree that it is good to keep an eye on the longer term even if you are having fun at the present.

I know I keep banging on about articles in the main site knowledge center but there is a really good one there about this very topic.  It is the article sponsored by Syngenta. 

Actually (bit off topic here but hopefully OK) but you might find it really helpful Betty.  Here is the link
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lava
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2007, 09:06:25 PM »

I too am not far enough in my career to evaluate it.  However, from looking at family members who are mid into their career, a lot of them are actually overworked and underpaid.  I personally think they are niether happy nor unhappy with their career.  I think they are content and don't want to change careers because there is a risk involved.  To change careers, would mean risking their income, lifestyle, and standard of living.  As long as bills are getting paid, they don't want to go through the stress of looking for work, going to interviews, relocating to new state, or leaning new company policies.  We are creatures of habit and despise change in all forms.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2007, 04:33:54 AM by lava » Report to moderator   Logged
Lisette
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2007, 08:24:59 AM »

I agree that there are a lot (probably too many) people who are just going to work and coming home again, day after day with no thought of the future and no particular enjoyment or pain.  Given what a high percentage of your life you spend at work it feels like it should be a more positive experience.  But equally you have to respect people's choices.  Someone who has a low tolerance of risk could become quite distressed if they opt out of this safe 'rut' and things go badly wrong.  But equally it seems a shame since it is nice if people get a buzz from going to work.  Even if the work itself is fairly routine they can get satisfaction from working with colleagues, meeting big orders etc. 
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