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April 16, 2014, 08:18:28 PM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumCandidates, Job Seekers, Employees, Consultants & Contractors CentreRecruitment: CVs/resumes and Applications (Moderators: Lisette, Forum Management)Make your CV a little different
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« on: March 19, 2007, 02:31:57 PM »

While there are a number of different "standard" CV formats, I think that employers are looking for a little more than exams, schools, etc.  They want to get a picture of you!

Interests and hobbies are very important and I would even consider adding a summary of your ambitions, etc.  Show yourself in your true colours and promote your best features.

What else would you add to your CV to be a little different?
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Lisette
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2007, 09:35:42 PM »

That is quite an interesting angle and I would certainly be interested in hearing views from others as well. I guess one of the risks is that to more you give of yourself the higher the risk that they will not like something you say.  So it needs to be a balance between being too bland and being to candid  Smiley if that is possible.

I certainly agree that you should try to find something that makes you seem a bit different, separates you out and makes the recruiter want to learn more.

Hobbies are also an interesting idea.  I am in two minds myself. It seems to be that they are either so policitcally correct that they are meaningless (keeping fit, charitable good works) or they run the risk of alienating one of the recruitment team (polictics, religion and stuff like that)

What do others thing?
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stanford
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2007, 06:42:24 AM »

Another important aspect is to make sure you send a good cover letter with your CV.  I have heard of stories where candidates forget to include their cover letter.  That's probably why they didn't get called in for an interview.  Just make sure your cover letter is adressed to a particular person and company.  You may want to have someone proof read your letter before sending it.  You may also want to visit your college career center and talk to a career counselor for any job advice. 
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HRManager
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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2007, 09:46:38 PM »

I support your suggestion of a cover letter, Stanford.  This gives you a chance to make a direct reference to the role and guide the reader so that they make the links between what you have done and what they are looking for.  They do take a bit of time to write since this is where you really customise things for the company and the job that you are applying to.  Clearly the top and bottom sentences can be standard but the rest needs care and attention.
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Tammy
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« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2007, 09:49:53 PM »

Talking of making things different, anyone here tried writing a really 'out there' cover letter.  Like a poem or something weird like that?
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HRManager
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« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2007, 09:59:08 PM »

As an HR manager I have had a few like that.  I once went for it - and responded - but the guy was truly doolaly and not just someone clever trying to catch your attention.  It sort of put me off.

I wonder if - but have no experience of this - whether it is an effective strategy for the more sane who are trying to break into a very creative area.  Hopefully we will get some people on the forum in this area who can share their experiences of thsi
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Wayne
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2007, 09:24:14 PM »

The problem with doing things a little different is that it has been done a certain way for many years now and employers sort of expect a prospective employee to apply in a standard way. Leave the flair for the interview and sell yourself as a genuine likable and reliable person.
I always discussed peoples ambitions with them even if that meant they would be leaving in a year or two. After all if people are not interested in bettering themselves then they will be poorly motivated and no employer wants that kind of person. On the other hand don't appear to be a threat to the interviewers job!
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HireScoresMark
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« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2007, 09:02:28 PM »

I'd say the CV/resume and cover letter are for getting you through the door - selling yourself as a solution to their problem. The interview is where your personality should shine - I've seen plenty of CVs with pictures and the like. Yes they are more memorable but they don't sway the situation in the slighest, the benefit as I see it is that I'll remember who you were AFTER you've been interviewed (i.e. I've seen so many I can't remember who was who).
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