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April 18, 2014, 01:29:22 AM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumRecruiters, Employers & Suppliers CentreGeneral employer topics (Moderators: HireScores.com admin, HireScoresMark)Employment contracts
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Author Topic: Employment contracts  (Read 1489 times)
Jasper9
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« on: December 11, 2010, 10:53:44 AM »

What actually is part of an employment contract?

I had always thought that the written offer of employment, detailing terms and conditions IS the employment contract.

The employer's "Policies and Procedures" or "Staff Hand book" are not contractural, unless perhaps  specific reference to it is made under a specific heading in the written offer ie for holiday accrual or notice periods. Perhaps even a note in the letter stating "your appointment is subject to your acceptance of the conditions of employment contained in the Staff Handbook enclosed"

I would also like to know whether employee benefits such as medical insurance, company car and employer pension contributions should be included in a payment "in lieu of notice".  ie if the company car is returned on termination but an allowance for the loss of this benefit is then due under the contract of employment, even if the employers "policy" states the car is to be returned  on termination day when "pay in lieu of notice"  applies.

« Last Edit: January 15, 2011, 07:36:24 AM by Jasper9 » Report to moderator   Logged
Jasper9
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« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2011, 07:39:30 AM »

Has anyone an opinion on this?

It would seem that Staff Policy or Staff Handbooks are relatively new development.
 In the 90's I found all employers used a  "PRINCIPAL STATEMENT OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT" which was attached to the offer letter.

This would then obviously and without ambiguity be contractual.
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Jonathan
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« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2011, 03:28:47 PM »

I assume anything can be put into an employment contract? I mean...do they all tend to follow a standard or do they differ depending on what the employer wants to include?
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Jasper9
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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2011, 02:56:36 PM »

Point was:

Policies and Procedures  by definition are not "Terms and Conditions"   Contracts have Terms & Conditions

For example, They may have a policy on Maternity pay that does not apply to men!

Needless to say as many people are finding out, they can change employment terms with or without consent.  You take it and keep your job or you are "made redundant"
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