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October 02, 2014, 11:26:33 AM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumRecruiters, Employers & Suppliers CentreGeneral employer topics (Moderators: HireScores.com admin, HireScoresMark)Businesses Warned About The Risks Of Long Hours Culture
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Author Topic: Businesses Warned About The Risks Of Long Hours Culture  (Read 5847 times)
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« on: October 31, 2009, 04:33:25 PM »

The development of the UK's long hours culture could be putting employees' health at risk, warns Aviva Risk Management Solutions (ARMS).

James Draper, principal consultant for ARMS, said: "In 2007/08, a total of 13.5 million working days were lost to work related stress, depression and anxiety.

“According to The TUC the credit crunch is putting extra pressure on people in both their personal and professional lives, with four million in the UK working over 48 hours a week and a worrying percentage of the population working more than 60 hours per week.

“What’s disturbing is that more than half of employers (59%) do not associate long hours with productivity and 46% do not reward staff who work late or out of hours."

Draper adds: “Longer working hours can cause severe problems such as musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular disorders, chronic infections, depression, stress and diabetes, as well as high blood pressure. Other problems associated with working longer hours include headaches, reduced immune system, extreme fatigue and insomnia.”

According to Aviva’s latest healthcare report, Health of the Workplace 3, nearly 60% of workers think that the current climate is making both them and their colleagues feel stressed and under pressure – with 45% saying that their company had no provision for dealing with stress.

The recruitment sector has reacted positively to the reports findings.

From a GP’s perspective, nine out of 10 believe that stress-related illness will increase due to the recession and be the biggest occupational health issue of 2009.

Alex Marshall, business development manager, Aviva’s UK occupational health, said: “Some of the reasons that employees are feeling extra pressure are linked to job insecurity, a strong commitment to their role or the need for employees to ‘take home’ pay to support their families.

“Around 37% of employees are failing to take lunch breaks so as a first step, employers should be encouraging a good work/life balance and promote a culture that encourages staff to take their statutory break.

“Businesses need to be aware that longer working hours can affect workplace performance. For example, higher accidents or injuries could result, as well as firms experiencing an increase in claims of incapacity and long term sickness benefits.

“There should be a strong focus on stress management, which should be treated like any other workplace hazard. A risk assessment should be carried out, both at organisational level and within each team, ensuring ongoing assessment. Solutions such as an Employee Assistance Programme should be put in place to mitigate future risks.”

Draper concluded: “Organisations should oversee employees who are struggling to cope. Consider flexible working patterns and, if possible, increase resources and decrease workloads. Firms should be setting a good example in these tough times by not encouraging staff to waive Working Time Legislation and steering clear of pay scales being linked to increased hours and work loads.

“Training and development programmes should be implemented through human resources departments to improve time management and delegation. Top management behaviour and commitment should also be encouraged to change the business culture to raise awareness of the issue,” he said.
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« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2009, 04:30:18 PM »

I found this fascinating. Mainly because a company that I used to work for frequently have members of staff working two sixteen hour shifts at the weekends. It's 4pm Friday till 8am Saturday and then the same from 4pm Saturday till 8am Sunday. I think this is probably illegal but the members of staff are happy enough as they get many hours in during a short period of time and get more time off. I wouldn't fancy it though. When I worked there I once pulled a double which was 8am Friday till midnight Friday night/Saturday morning. That was tough. I also frequently worked 12 hours without a break on a Saturday and Sunday but again, it meant I had more time off.

Getting back to the article I think there are many smaller companies (such as taxi firms for example) who wont pay a bit of notice as their employees are not in a union.
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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2010, 03:24:53 AM »

Companies must find ways to manage long hours work problems. Most employees especially those who work in the offices, spend long-hours on work but are not productive as they are suppose to be. Moreover, because of stress, they developed physical and psychological problems. I think management must really come up with the solution that offers bigger salary based on quality and quantity of work at an enough number of hours.
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« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2010, 04:11:36 PM »

Interesting post, its apparent how late hours can have such an effect on the health of your employees.

Thanks,

Phil
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« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2010, 05:46:44 PM »

Hi Phil welcome to the discussions here. It's always good to have a new member on board.
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