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HireScores.com Recruitment ForumRecruiters, Employers & Suppliers CentreGeneral employer topics (Moderators: HireScores.com admin, HireScoresMark)What Exactly Is Flexible Working?
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Author Topic: What Exactly Is Flexible Working?  (Read 2168 times)
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« on: October 10, 2009, 03:21:23 PM »

When people think about flexible working, they mainly imagine part time work, but the term encompasses a huge range of different ways of working and new options are being added all the time. Here are some of the options on offer:

Flexitime: employees work an agreed number of hours over a set period. Usually some core hours are agreed, with flexible start and finish times and the option of time off in lieu if more hours are worked.

Compressed hours: working more hours in a shorter period, for example, working four long days instead of five shorter ones.

Annualised or seasonal hours: employees work longer hours in busy periods and fewer hours at other times of the year/season.

Homeworking or teleworking: employees work from home because their job is suited to homeworking, work from home a day or more a week or work from home on an occasional basis.

Job shares: two employees share the same job, with the work usually divided 50:50 so each employee works 2.5 days a week, although some people choose to work on alternate weeks instead. Not all job shares are split evenly.
Term-time only work: employees work during school term-times only, and have the holidays off.
Temporary reduced hours/phased return or retirement: reduced hours agreed on a temporary basis, for instance by mothers returning after maternity leave or by people heading towards retirement. The time period for reduced hours is usually agreed beforehand.

Part-time work: working reduced hours from the normal 9-5 day.

Some employees use a variety of flexible options, for instance, working part time with one day working from home.

Clare Dean works part time as a Human Resources Manager for a Sales and Marketing consultancy based in Ascot. Her hours are 9.30am to 3pm 4 days per week which allows her to see her two small children. She switched from a full time job around half a year ago after seeing her current job advertised on WorkingMums website. “I realised that as much as we needed for me to work full time financially, I actually wasn't able to devote to anyone ie my children, my husband, my job and myself - enough time and energy resulting in all areas of our lives being affected and me having to leave my job after 7 years (in post) to be able to readdress the balance and satisfy us all,” she says.

Jenny Keen also got her job as a home-based estate agent through WorkingMums. She works 16 hours a week around her three year old, who attends preschool. She had taken three years out of the workplace after giving birth.

Kam Kaur is a local government worker and single parent of two primary school-aged children. She works compressed hours. This means she works longer hours for four days a week, allowing her to have Fridays off to pick up her children from school. She says the flexibility this gives her is invaluable.

WorkingMums.co.uk is a jobsite and community that helps recruiters meet the needs of today’s demanding and constantly changing business environments. It provides its clients with access to highly skilled and experienced professionals who are looking for flexible, part and full-time office and home-based job opportunities. The WorkingMums.co.uk database holds over 40,000 qualified candidates that span a large range of experience and professions including, finance and accounting, sales, marketing and PR, IT, secretarial, HR and administration. Suitable for both senior and support roles with over five years experience in their industry.
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Robin Tetley
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2009, 01:59:47 PM »

I used to work four long days in a past job and have three days off. That was great. Though not flexible they happened to be my shifts. Now I am a "flexible worker" I guess, or a "homeworker" anyway. It's wonderful to be able to choose what hours you work.

What do others think of this report?
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2009, 04:39:47 PM »

I reckon if parents of kids can get part time jobs or jobs that they can do around dropping their kids off at school and picking them up again then that's good.
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Gota
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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2009, 04:24:15 PM »

I agree with the last point and I think that anything that makes work easier for an employee should be welcomed with open arms. As long as the finished work product is the same the employer should be applauded.
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Jasper9
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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2010, 01:22:32 PM »

Flexible working was introduced to enable public sector workers to go home early on a Friday (if they go in at all!) after accumulating time by having reduced lunch "hours" and getting in "early".  Some can use this ruse to get two extra days off a month.

At least it saves them having to look busy for a full working week.
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