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December 19, 2014, 08:58:51 AM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumForum CommunityNews & Information (Moderator: Forum Management)Employment Law A Major Headache For Small Firms
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Author Topic: Employment Law A Major Headache For Small Firms  (Read 1631 times)
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« on: August 13, 2009, 01:15:02 PM »

Navigating a mass of employment law is a major problem for the UK’s smallest firms, with nearly half having faced difficulties working with the legislation, according to new research from the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC).

In a keynote address delivered at the BCC’s Annual Business Convention in Birmingham recently, David Frost challenged government ministers with the findings. He argued for a moratorium on employment law:

“Too often the Government sees the answer to a problem as being more legislation. Not least in the area of employment law. The result of this will mean that it will take longer to get out of recession and companies will be loathe to take on more employees.

“If we are really serious about helping businesses, about creating jobs, why not have a complete moratorium on new employment legislation for the next three years?”

The BCC’s workforce survey, which questioned 3,400 businesses, also highlights the importance of migrant workers to British firms. Around a quarter of businesses employ migrant labour because of a shortage in suitable local candidates with the required skills, experience and work ethic.

Some of the key findings in the report include:

* Employment law is a major problem for small firms, with 47% having faced difficulties navigating the legislation.

* Around a quarter of businesses employ migrant labour because of a shortage in suitable local candidates with the requisite skills, experience and work ethic.

* Half of the UK’s businesses have not recruited in the last six months, while 24% are not planning to fill positions that become vacant when an employee leaves.

* An overwhelming majority (84%) of flexible working requests are granted by employers.

* Only 28% of businesses are using JobCentre Plus, with this figure falling to 14% for firms with fewer than five employees.

David Frost said:

“This downturn has largely allied the interests of employers and employees. Employers want to retain their skilled and experienced staff, while employees want to remain in work and are often prepared to take pay cuts and freezes to do so.

“More help is needed to support Britain’s hard-pressed businesses so that they can drive our economy out of recession, creating jobs and wealth in the process.”
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Robin Tetley
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« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2009, 07:55:55 AM »

A couple of smaller firms I've worked for haven't cared too much for employment law. Accrued holiday time things like that.
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Gota
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2009, 04:16:54 PM »

But they have to don't they? I mean they have to follow these employment laws?
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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2009, 02:16:09 PM »

You would have thought so.

They just really had to be dragged kicking and screaming but they sort of got there.
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Malcolm
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2009, 04:45:24 PM »

What do you mean kicking and screaming?
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« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2009, 02:57:46 PM »

Kicking and screaming in the sense that if I hadn't written down exactly what I was owed and what I'd already taken they would have tried to con me out of it. They often lied about law to do with bank holidays (particularly at Christmas) so unless you were pretty savvy they may have been able to persuade me that the law had changed and that I was no longer entitled to what I knew I was.

A letter to ACAS that I showed them did the trick finally  Shocked.
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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2009, 12:48:11 PM »

ACAS do a fantastic job. I don't know what we'd do without them frankly.
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Bob
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2009, 04:27:04 PM »

So what does ACAS stand for does anybody know? I would have thought the word employment would be in there but obviously not.

In fact are they a union or just a company that helps people?

I'm intrigued.
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« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2009, 03:03:54 PM »

I probably shouldn't admit this but I'm not too sure what it stands for either. I think arbitrary is one of the A's though. Their official website will help.
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