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April 19, 2014, 10:34:15 AM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumCandidates, Job Seekers, Employees, Consultants & Contractors CentreCareer and Employment Advice (Moderator: HireScores.com admin)Office Workers Sacrifice Everyday Spending For Financial Survival
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Author Topic: Office Workers Sacrifice Everyday Spending For Financial Survival  (Read 3193 times)
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« on: April 18, 2009, 04:10:27 PM »

A shocking 48 percent of employed UK office workers, including secretaries, PAs and HR professionals, have been forced to cut back on basic essentials such as grocery shopping and heating to help them budget after being hit hard by the credit crunch.

Nearly a third of respondents to the survey commissioned by debt management company Debt Lifeboat, admitted that credit card debt and bank loans were becoming a burden. In order to meet these repayments plus mortgages and monthly bills, many are resorting to life-changing measures.

Despite the fact that indulgences including smoking and drinking have been stubbed out by nearly 40 percent of office workers and employees to save cash, many are still not saving for unexpected emergencies.

Phillip Allen, managing director of Debt Lifeboat, is concerned: 'Our survey shows that some people are taking drastic measures to meet repayments and the rising cost of living.

'Over 40 percent of respondents say they are unable to save, but it is likely that with a more structured approach they may be able to cut out unnecessary spending. Strict budgeting, discussing financial difficulties with creditors, setting a limit on cash withdrawals and checking bank balances more regularly can help, allowing people to take control of their finances without sacrificing too much.'
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« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2009, 08:51:14 PM »

Strict budgeting? Is there any other way to budget? I can never understand some friends who say they have 12 to last a week and a half till pay day because it's near the end of the month. We always divide our money equally to spread it evenly over the amount of weeks in a month. Sure we don't go out at the start of the month and "blow" a large amount of money on a great night out but although sensible can be boring we never run out of money before the end of the month.
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2009, 06:04:57 PM »

I am also one of those people who budget their spending.I enjoy having money in my savings account, especially for those emergency situations such as when our car breaks down. 

I don't know how or why some people live from pay check to pay check.  That's too stressful for me.  I like to be control of my money! 
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2009, 10:49:42 AM »

I agree fully with you Betty. It baffles me how you could get your pay and go out for a big night out not considering how long it has to last. Even when I was younger and not so responsible I was always responsible (ish) with my wages. Some people might read thins and think, how boring but oh well.
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2009, 02:55:39 PM »

When I was in college, kids used to spend mom and dad's money all the time by going out to bars.  Others were driving cars that their parent bought them. 

These kids did not understand responsibility.  Instead they are learning to spend..spend..spend.  I think those who grow up "poor"  are more responsible with their money.  Do you agree?
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Jenna
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 02:59:14 PM »

I don't agree with the concept that "poor" people are more responsible with money.  I work with poor and disadvantage people and many of them spend money without understanding how to spend wisely. 

That's the key...learning how to spend on items you need, rather than what you want for pleasure.
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2009, 12:25:10 PM »

Great discussion here. I think there's a sense that when somebody leaves home for the first time to go to college/Uni they're bound to blow off a bit of steam. Drink to much, party to much etc etc. In one sense that's what those years are for...as well as the studying of course. You suddenly become like an adult and that can be a shock to the system for many people. I agree fully about having to learn to be responsible but sadly that often comes after making mistakes. I think most people learn more from mistakes than they do successes. Does anybody agree with that statement?
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Betty
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« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2009, 10:19:19 PM »

When I went to college, there were students who were responsible, never partied, or went drinking to bars with their friends.  These students came from a very strict upbringing and their parents strongly encouraged them to succeed.  So there was no time to fool areound and mess up.


I do agree that people tend to learn more from their mistakes than if they succeed in life.  I wish it wasn't that way.
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« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2009, 10:21:08 PM »

If people learn from their mistakes, then why are there so many people in jail who have done more than one crime over and over again. 

How come these people didn't learn from their mistakes?
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« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2009, 10:56:06 AM »

It's true everybody doesn't learn from their mistakes, good point Jenna. I think on the whole people, non criminal people, do learn from their mistakes. I mean more mistakes to do with life, trusting people, getting drunk, spending all your wages on stupid things, these kinds of things.

I don't know what the deal is with criminals? Maybe it's the way they were raised? Maybe they don't know any differently? Maybe it's habitual? I'm not seeking to make excuses here for people who break the law by the way. Just thinking out loud.
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« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2009, 12:30:23 PM »

Did anybody see the Louis Theroux documentary on BBC TV last Sunday evening?
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« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2009, 12:20:01 PM »

I caught a bit of it. Strange.
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« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2009, 09:29:20 PM »

It's true everybody doesn't learn from their mistakes, good point Jenna. I think on the whole people, non criminal people, do learn from their mistakes. I mean more mistakes to do with life, trusting people, getting drunk, spending all your wages on stupid things, these kinds of things.

I don't know what the deal is with criminals? Maybe it's the way they were raised? Maybe they don't know any differently? Maybe it's habitual? I'm not seeking to make excuses here for people who break the law by the way. Just thinking out loud.

From what info I've gathered and research read, 9/10 people who go to jail are there because of a serious deprivation in an area of their welfare. So instead of the root problem being looked at for a soluton, it's easier just to throw them into jail. Though it's no ones fault, there's far too much populace and general world complexities to be able to fulfil everyone's well being.
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« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2009, 12:06:19 PM »

Hey welcome to the forums here Rosszero. I agree with everything you said here. 100%.
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« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2009, 12:57:40 PM »

I'm a bit more for the rehabilitation than simply locking people up myself. I think you can lock somebody up who made a mistake early in life and twenty years later release them a fully trained criminal.
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