Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

9182 Posts in 2295 Topics- by 184 Members - Latest Member: benjonesaa

October 23, 2014, 06:53:35 AM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumForum CommunityNews & Information (Moderator: Forum Management)TUC Advice For Workers Facing Redundancy
Pages: [1]
Send this topicPrint
Author Topic: TUC Advice For Workers Facing Redundancy  (Read 2438 times)
forum admin
Administrator
somewhat obsessed
*****
Posts: 1153


« on: March 11, 2009, 01:34:36 PM »

The TUC recently launched a comprehensive package of advice for workers who have been made redundant, or are at risk of redundancy or of losing their homes due to the economic downturn.

The package includes two new free booklets – Coping with the Economic Downturn and Facing Redundancy – as well as updated information about redundancies, how to use JobCentre Plus, how to look for a new job, and what training and benefits individuals are entitled to on worksmart.org.uk, the TUC’s website for people at work.

Facing Redundancy is the newest addition to the TUC’s Know Your Rights series of leaflets and can be downloaded or ordered for free. It contains a comprehensive guide to the law on redundancy, redundancy pay, employers’ duties to consult and to select the person being made redundant in a fair and open manner. It also provides information on how to claim Job Seeker's Allowance.

Coping with the Economic Downturn is written by the TUC with input from Citizens Advice (CAB) and tackles: what to do if you are faced with redundancy; making sure you claim the right benefits; dealing with debt and rising prices; accessing work, skills and training; and a section on where to turn for further help and advice.

The TUC’s world of work website workSMART not only has downloads of both leaflets, but also contains questions and answers on all aspects of redundancy.

TUC General Secretary Brendan Barber said: “With unemployment due to exceed two million and possibly hit three, more than 1,500 people a week are losing their jobs. Many will be facing redundancy and unemployment for the first time in their lives.

“But these are not the only victims of recession. Many others are losing pay as they lose overtime or face lay-offs. Millions more fear unemployment as benefits set at levels designed to deter ‘scroungers’ are way below what most people need to pay back debts and meet regular outgoings. All these are reasons why now, more than ever, people should consider joining a union.

“Unions are experts at handling the threat of redundancy, and can often win the argument for alternatives or at least negotiate a package better than the legal minimum.

“But these guides make union advice on redundancy available to all, and we are delighted to have produced a wider guide with Citizens Advice on dealing with the downturn that combines union expertise on redundancy with CAB expertise on debt, benefits and consumer issues.”

Citizens Advice Head of Communications Nigel Shattock said: “The current credit crunch, rising food and fuel costs and the increasing likeliness of recession are resulting in more people needing help and advice from the CAB service over money, benefits, employment, mortgage and redundancy problems.

“This leaflet is an excellent sign-posting and self-help tool for those who are worried about their employment prospects, at risk of redundancy or have recently lost their jobs.”
Report to moderator   Logged

Timber
liking it
***
Posts: 199


« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2009, 04:34:50 PM »

I feel really terrible for those people who can't find a job and have a house to pay for.  It's a growing trend that I see a lot these days.  The only words of advice for these people is to seek work independently by starting your own business.  if no one is hiring, this might be a good opportunity to be your own boss.  Just a thought...
Report to moderator   Logged
Robin Tetley
Administrator
somewhat obsessed
*****
Posts: 1322


WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2009, 11:28:58 AM »

I agree (though who wouldn't?) with what you said here Timber about feeling terrible for people not being able to find a job but have a house to pay for.

I guess the thing about starting your own business is that you'd have to find something that was needed and not over saturated in the market.

Tricky to do.

Cab/taxi driver might be a good place to start?
Report to moderator   Logged

Timber
liking it
***
Posts: 199


« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2009, 03:53:54 PM »

I know someone who is currently a taxi cab driver and that job can be very dangerous.  A few years ago he was driving his taxi cab and he was robbed.  The customer pulled out a gun and actually shot him.  Luckily the bullet just missed him.  After that event, you would think he'd quit his job, but he's still driving a taxi cab. 

Do taxi cab drivers make good money?  Maybe that's why he's still driving.
Report to moderator   Logged
Robin Tetley
Administrator
somewhat obsessed
*****
Posts: 1322


WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2009, 01:00:15 PM »

It depends really on the area and so many things. Taxi drivers around here (Nottingham) CAN make very good money if they put the hours in. You are your own boss to a certain degree and can work as much or as little as you like. The one thing I know (at least about Nottingham taxi drivers) is that they moan alot. I mean you've never heard anybody moaning the way a taxi driver moans. If it's quiet, they moan, if it's busy, it just makes up for the quiet week. Most of them in my experience are big, big moaners.
Report to moderator   Logged

Jenna
liking it
***
Posts: 175


« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2009, 03:24:30 PM »

Moaning taxi drivers?  Usually I hear taxi drivers who curse when they get aggravated with the traffic, especially in New York city.  Speaking of taxi drivers,  I heard you really need to be careful of taxi drivers who purposely take the long way to get to you destination so they get more money.  I heard a lot of them do this to New York city tourists. 

Something you may want to think about the next time your in New York City Robin.. Wink
Report to moderator   Logged
Robin Tetley
Administrator
somewhat obsessed
*****
Posts: 1322


WWW
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2009, 12:17:23 PM »

It's true that we wouldn't know if a taxi driver took the long way around in New York. But then if we were in New York we probably wouldn't care  Roll Eyes. Last time one of the things we wanted to do was take a New York yellow cab but we didn't get around to it. I think we will next time but probably only from downtown to Times Square or something so they couldn't really go a long way round...I'd like to take a cab all the way up Broadway.
Report to moderator   Logged

Jenna
liking it
***
Posts: 175


« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2009, 09:19:43 PM »

Another thing about cab drivers in New York City is the way they drive.  They are extrememly agressive on the road and I wouldn't be surprise if they've gotten in a few fender benders. 

Do you ever tip your taxi driver?
Report to moderator   Logged
Robin Tetley
Administrator
somewhat obsessed
*****
Posts: 1322


WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2009, 09:55:37 AM »

Having worked for two taxi firms I like to try and tip a little as I know how hard it is for a lot of them to make ends meet. Or the ones I know/knew anyway.

What's a fender bender? I've heard this expression a bit and being English it goes a bit over my head. Does it just mean a crash?
Report to moderator   Logged

Coultrane
liking it
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2009, 07:01:16 PM »

A fender bender is when a car hits another vehicle or any thing else.  Some times the hit creates a small dent and something bigger.  That's called a fender bender  Grin

I'm glad that you tip taxi cab drivers.  I suppose you understand completely what they go through on a daily basis.  I'm the same way with waiters and waitresses.  I always give them an extra big tip because I used to do that type of work.
Report to moderator   Logged
Robin Tetley
Administrator
somewhat obsessed
*****
Posts: 1322


WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2009, 11:25:21 AM »

Ahhh so this is the "fender bender".

Thanks for that.

It's a phrase that's pretty alien to people in the UK I'd imagine because we don't use the term fender.
Report to moderator   Logged

Pages: [1]
Send this topicPrint
Jump to:  


Find out more about hirescores recruitment scoring
Theme orange-lt created by panic customised by creospace