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HireScores.com Recruitment ForumForum CommunityGeneral stuff (Moderators: HireScores.com admin, HireScoresMark)More On Generation Y
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« on: January 31, 2009, 01:50:15 PM »

We were having a discussion recently about Generation Y and I came across this recent news article. I thought it may be of interest.
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The whole Generation Y concept of work - where flexibility, work life balance and a socially responsible employer is demanded by jobseekers - is set to change. That's according to Steve Carter, Managing Director of accountancy and finance recruitment specialist Nigel Lynn.

'I'm not suggesting that we shouldn't have flexibility in the workplace', says Carter, far from it, but according to recent research from the London Business School, while Generation X often requires flexibility for childcare, Generation Y demands it for lifestyle reasons. And according to a report in The Observer back in May, Generation Y jobseekers are 'ready to resign if their jobs are not fulfilling and fun, with decent holidays and the opportunity to take long stretches off for charity work or travel.'

'In this market, that attitude isn't going to go down terribly well with potential employers - many of whom may well be boomers and Generation X themselves and who had to really buckle down during the last major recession. And it's going to be those people who can demonstrate that they can add real value to a business that will succeed. That means getting back to the Generation X ethos of hard work, long hours and potentially less time off. There will also need to be an acceptance that Generation X managers and leaders who have worked through a major downturn in the past will have valuable lessons to pass on. And above all, job seekers will need to demonstrate an attitude which reflects what they can do for their employer - not what their employer can do for them!'

Generation Y is a group that has never witnessed recession or economic hardship. They have grown up in a booming economy with rising house prices and a raging war for talent and so it is not surprising that they tend to talk about what they want from work. They may have some hard lessons to learn in the months to come.
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Bob
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2009, 02:47:41 PM »

Personally I think these sweeping generalisations are too broad. Generation X demands this whilst Generation Y lives with that. It seems to me about as accurate as reading my horoscopes. Just my opinion of course.
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Drake
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 07:46:51 PM »

I agree that generation Y workers present themselves differently than previous generations.  They're work ethic is more self centered and don't want work to interfere with their lifestyle.  I have seen this already at work and they usually don't last long. 

Who should we blame for their behavior?  Someone should be at fault, but who?
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Teddy
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2009, 07:36:38 PM »

Generation Y consists on my nephews who are about to graduate form college and hit the job market.  To me, they don't know the meaning of hard work and dedication.  They had everything handed to them as children.  My sister and her husband make a good living and often bought everything for their children.  If things are handed to you as a child, your work ethic will be different. 

So I blame the parents.  If you spoil a kid, they don't appreciate anything!
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2009, 08:55:07 PM »

Yes, the parents play an important role in the development of children, but you are also forgetting the schools.  They also play a major role.  I have found that schools are not the same when you or I when we grew up.  Today they don't challenge kids and the A's that I got were much harder to achieve.  If they make school easy of kids, they wont know how to preserver through hard times and on a job.
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2009, 11:46:40 AM »

Whilst I have no children. Yet. I have to agree with the point about spoiling children I really do. I don't think I was "spoilt" in the traditional sense of the word but in some areas I was. I'm stating the obvious here but your childhood and parental example plays a huge part on your work ethic. Your whole life of course. This is a point that can't really be under estimated in my opinion.
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Betty
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2009, 06:49:04 PM »

My father is amazed at how much kids have today.  My father grew up in a farm and never had the fancy toys that kids have now.  In fact, he tells me stories of how he used to make his own toys such as a baseball by taking a rag and wrapping it with tape.  He is totally shocked at all the computer gadgets kids have and the numerous toys they have to choose from. 

My Dad grew up working hard and valued money.  He never had a credit card and sent all his kids to a private school.  I think there are few people today who can save money and not rely on credit cards to support their family.  Back then, it was a different generation and I think they have a lot of wisdom to share.
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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2009, 01:15:47 PM »

Very much wisdom. A certain amount of time goes by and you find yourself in a bit of a hole that you yourself dug. Credit cards are just wrong yet so many of rely on them to fill that slight gap from month to month. I think getting out of debt is going to be my primary focus from now on.
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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2009, 04:29:31 PM »

The credit card are a necessary evil aren't they for getting by each month. It's just how things are.
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Betty
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« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2009, 06:12:14 AM »

I have a credit card and I can't stand them!  Listen to this, I have a credit card with citibank.  I always paid my credit card on time, never late, and even paid a little bit more than the min to get the balance down. I owned this card for 10 years with an excellent credit history.

A few months ago I get a letter in the mail telling me they will be raising their interest rate which includes me and other customers.  If you recall, citibank isn't doing well financially, so they punished their good customers by raising their interest rate.  Isn't that terrible!  I was so proud of myself for getting my balance down, but now my min payment is higher than it was before and it will take me longer to pay off the credit card.

I feel as though I was robbed!

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« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2009, 11:45:40 AM »

That is terrible. I think you have been robbed. Of sorts anyway. I guess all you can do now is get it paid off asap and cut it up. That's my plan with my credit cards long term. Whether I'll actually reach that point is of course another matter.
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« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2009, 05:00:34 PM »

I understand your anger with credit cards, but a word of advice.  Never close your credit card!  You can go ahead and pay off your debt, but if you close your credit card account, your credit rating will go down.  The reason is when you close a credit card, you are also closing your credit history with them, so you will have no record to see if you are credit worthy.  The result is a lower credit score.  Did anyone know this?
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« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2009, 01:02:51 PM »

I had no idea it affected your credit rating negatively if you pay your credit card balance and cancel your account. Strange and fascinating.
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« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2009, 02:21:31 PM »

This is news to me TomTom. I would have thought no credit cards = brilliant credit rating.
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« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2009, 04:49:00 PM »

I too used to think if you had no credit cards, you had excellent credit rating, but you don't.  Crazy isn't it?

You need to have used credit cards to establish a credit history.  Another bit of information, try to have a small balance on your credit cards to maintain a credit history.  This means you should not have a zero balance for a long length of time. If your not using your credit card and have a zero balance, your credit rating will go down.   Undecided
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