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August 31, 2014, 07:15:25 AM
HireScores.com Recruitment ForumForum CommunityGeneral stuff (Moderators: HireScores.com admin, HireScoresMark)How much money do you need to make you happy?
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Author Topic: How much money do you need to make you happy?  (Read 1873 times)
stanford
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« on: April 08, 2007, 05:15:43 AM »

I always here people say that no matter how much money they make, its never enough.  I know the more you make, the more you buy, the more you spend, the more money you want.  Its a vicious cycle.  Sometimes I look at people who are extremely wealthy like Oprah Winfrey or Donald Trump who could retire today but continue to work. Aren't they happy?  How much more money do they need?  If I were in their shoe's would I act the same? 
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MaryG
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2007, 05:29:29 PM »

It sort of depends on where you are in your life to a degree, doesn't it? A lot of families with young children just want to make enough to make ends meet and still be able to spend time as a family. Some people want to make as much money as possible so they can keep up to a certain standard of living, which, I agree continues to rise as you have more money. I wonder how many people are content with being able to pay the bills, have a little extra and not be working all the time.
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freeform
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« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2007, 10:28:48 AM »

Sometimes I look at people who are extremely wealthy like Oprah Winfrey or Donald Trump who could retire today but continue to work. Aren't they happy?  How much more money do they need? 

Surely it isn't about the money - it's about the work itself and the non-financial rewards that come with personal and professional achievement. The money at that stage becomes a byproduct not the purpose of the work.

I seem to remember some sort of saying that went - earning $1 more than you need is a good week, earning $1 less than you need is a bad one.
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Mark Nagurski
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Betty
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2007, 08:26:45 AM »

I think for some people, money becomes an addiction.  The more money you make, the more powerful you become.  Sure, Oprah can retire, but she probably gets a "high" from seeing her bank account increase every day.  She worked hard to get where she is and if she quits, she may also think she's letting her fans down. Money is a crazy thing. You need it to survive and the more money you have, the more freedom and opportunities you are given. 
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Serious
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2007, 08:35:37 AM »

I do think, however, that it also true that the more money you earn the less time you have to enjoy it.  You eat out because you do not have the time or energy to cook (and because you can afford it you eat out at nice places so they cease to be special).  You pay for things to be done since you cannot fit them in. Thus your 'maintenance' costs become higher - and things like mortgages etc are much higher.  Don't get me wrong, I would not object to being in this position, I just think that it is true that the more you have, the more you need.

The only time I have felt that I had money to spare was when living one life style with a different income.  So for me the first year after leaving University I sort of continued to live as if I was at University in terms of my spending - unconsiously, I was just slow to adapt.  After a year I had saved up quite a bit of money (without really planning to).  But after this things went downhill, I bought somewhere to live, I started to shop a bit more expensively, and so on and soon I was at that happy equilibrium - money out equalled money in.  [which is a nice thing and a lot nicer than money in not equally money out].
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freeform
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2007, 01:14:09 PM »

So for me the first year after leaving University I sort of continued to live as if I was at University in terms of my spending - unconsiously, I was just slow to adapt.  After a year I had saved up quite a bit of money (without really planning to). 

I think I spent more as a student than I do now!
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Mark Nagurski
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Greg
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« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2007, 08:05:37 PM »

I think the more money you make, chances are you have no time for anything else.  If your working long hours, you also feel entitled to spend money.  Your begin to reward your self for all the stress your high salary job gives you.  You also feel entitled to the nicer things in life.  We live in a society that encourages people to spend everyday.  Every where you look your being hit with advertisements.  Its on the radio, TV, newpapers, magazines, street signs, etc... Everyone wants your money and if you get caught in the cycle, you need more money to spend, spend, spend!
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